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inkinupstamps
09-05-2007, 08:17 AM
Paul found a brand new set (box) of Pentel Water Colors in 12 colors while he was going through some boxes in the basement. I've never seen watercolors in tubes before. I thought they were oils at first because you use a palette and mix them first for other colors but they are to be mixed with water first.

I'm going to play with these. I love my twinkling H2O's and occasionally use my watercolor pencils but I've never used watercolor paint that comes in small tubes before. I'm going to feel like Monet or Renoir! :wub:

Seriously, has anyone ever used watercolors in this medium before? Any tips for application and mixing? I usually use my #3 brush for watercolor painting but I'd appreciate any tips.

If I get anything presentable I'll post later.

loobylou
09-05-2007, 09:33 AM
I don't have any tips, but it's interesting to know that you use a size 3 brush. I just bought some. I hope it helps me be as good as you!!!
Sarah

teabear
09-05-2007, 10:28 AM
I have some of those, too. Haven't played with them yet. I picked them up at a yard sale. I think you spritz the paper with water or brush on water first to get it damp and then use a plastic pallette or paper plate to blend your colors on. Julie says she likes cold press water color paper better than hot press because it is smoother for over-stamping. That's about all I know :)

keltie
09-05-2007, 11:14 AM
Hi,
That is what I just found, and used to paint backgound. I just put three colors out on my palate and mixed and played as I went. I was thinking of trying it the same way on some images. For the BG I used my big wash brush from my old tole paints.
Heather
http://stamp-shack.com/photopost/showphoto.php?photo=9224&ppuser=81
[I'll be waiting to see your creations.

Erin K
09-05-2007, 11:29 AM
I use them, I had them from that art class I took a few years back. I really like them for some things but find more that I use them for cool color wash backgrounds than for painting images.

You totally can of course use them for painting images.

Have you opened them? If they are old (even mine do it after like a year) they may need to be massaged (they are tubes right) before you squirt them out because they get seperated, not all colors, I used to know which colors and why just those colors did it but I forget now. And this is important: Do you have white? If so it's highly toxic. There isn't really white in watercolor, it's something else and it seriously is toxic. ESPECIALLY if injested by a pregnant woman. I was pregnant during my art class and the teacher said NO ONE could use or bring or open their white with me in class! I was suprised and went on the net and he was sure right. (because i somehow trusted the internet over a real live art teacher in front of me?)

You don't have to thin them with water if you don't want. You can use them straight for a much thicker look.

If you do backgrounds there are cool tricks like you can apply a wash of blue (or any color) then while it's wet sprinkle salt over it and when it's all dry brush the salt away and you will get a cool speckle effect because the salt will soak up the paint.

You probably know this from your twinks, but if you don't want one color to bleed into the next you have to wait for it to dry before doing the adjoining color. for some things you can use the bleeding to your advantage, especially cool on flowers, put a touch of a deeper shade in the center and it wicks out in a cool way.

You can also paint just clear water over and area and then put a bit of color on your brush and let it wick into the clear painted area for a cool shaded/light effect.

um.. that's all I have right now.

Far North
09-05-2007, 12:27 PM
Oh Jennifer you are in for so much fun!!

Here is an example and info on one of favorite watercolor/stamping techniques...
Select approx 3 stamps-stamp and emboss in clear on a whole sheet of watercolor paper. Some images can overlap and go off the edges.
Wet watercolor paper (I actually quickly pass it under the facet) Brush a few colors of watercolor across the paper. Dry with heat gun. With ink stamp a few more images on top. Place watercolor paper upside down on paper towels and iron backside to melt the embossing to remove it from the paper. In the example I cut the paper and made it into a card box.

I can't see wait to see what you try!...Jan

inkinupstamps
09-05-2007, 01:53 PM
Oh Jennifer you are in for so much fun!!

Here is an example and info on one of favorite watercolor/stamping techniques...
Select approx 3 stamps-stamp and emboss in clear on a whole sheet of watercolor paper. Some images can overlap and go off the edges.
Wet watercolor paper (I actually quickly pass it under the facet) Brush a few colors of watercolor across the paper. Dry with heat gun. With ink stamp a few more images on top. Place watercolor paper upside down on paper towels and iron backside to melt the embossing to remove it from the paper. In the example I cut the paper and made it into a card box.

I can't see wait to see what you try!...Jan


Jan, your box is beautiful! Thanks for the tips ladies. I've had a fun morning playing with them.

I am not sure if it is just because it is something new to me or if I actually do like these better than other types of watercolors. Either way, I'm really enjoying playing with, mixing, washing...just trying all different things out with them. I don't have anything I'll share yet as I'm pretty much just trying out and experimenting with them for now.

Thanks again for everyone's advice! I recommend these!